Posted tagged ‘marketing’

Twit·ter – v. 1. to utter a succession of small, tremulous sounds, as a bird.

April 10, 2009

Twit·ter
– v. (used without object)  1. to utter a succession of small, tremulous sounds, as a bird.twitter

Twitter is the latest popular social phonomenon. In “Are you a Twit if you don’t want to Twitter?” Martha Irvine argues that while twitter is the latest social phonomenon, perhaps there is a social networking fatigue developing; she sources several people who are willing to admit they are less than fans. However, according to “Twitter Traffic Surging” on USA Today’s site: “Worldwide visitors neared 10 million in February, up more than 700 percent in a year. In the U.S., Twitter hit 4 million visitors — up more than 1,000 percent from a year ago.” – and the demographic using the site is older than that traditionally drawn to social web tools. The article quotes comScore: “More specifically, 45-54 year olds are 36 percent more likely than average to visit Twitter, making them the highest indexing age group, followed by 25-34 year olds, who are 30 percent more likely.”

Both articles look at Twitter in some ways compared to Facebook, which was quickly adopted by the college age group (although neither mention that Facebook was also specifically targeted at first to this group). Irvine proposes it as a way to peek into your friends lives, being given minute-to-minute updates on what they are doing. In that people (especially in the 25-34 year old age group) are ‘fatigued’ and are not looking for yet another way to do this, I agree with Irvine. They already have a site that serves these needs. Why look at and learn to use another?

My own use of Twitter is very different from that mentioned by Irvine, however. (more…)

Tracking Consumers : Not Just For the FBI

March 15, 2009

person-question_1According to an article on BusinessWeek.com, a new company named Sense Networks is working to track consumer movements through their cell phones. It then groups consumers by ‘tribes’ based upon the places they visit and upon common behaviors.

In the article, the focus is on how this data could be used to create much more targeted advertising campaigns, but upon reading it, I began thinking about how it could be used by magazines, newspapers and books.

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A Publishing Brand

February 17, 2009

Today, I received my latest Borders Member email, and included a mention of the book Deeper, part of a series by Roderick Gordon and Brian Williams, released earlier this month. None of that is significant, on it’s own. However, the first line of the ad for the book is, “From the publisher of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter books come another series about a boy and the depths of evil.”

picture-3The idea that the book is being marketed to the Harry Potter audience is what caught my eye. Is Scholastic (probably one of the publishing companies best known to consumers as a brand, and therefore well positioned to try this) trying to brand their company? Traditionally, publishing companies have tried to brand books by author. The opening line of this ad  doesn’t NAME the publisher in question. So it is assuming that consumers either know who published Harry Potter, or that they don’t care but will buy from that publisher BECAUSE of what they’ve previously published.

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Building Blocks of Blogs

February 11, 2009

Blogs are a hot item these days. Everyone seems to have one – or to want to have one. There are several things that should be considered, though, before you ‘roll out the presses’ – or, rather, don’t.
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The Facebook Fetish: Marketing for Free

February 4, 2009

I have often mentioned my view of social networking as a marketing tool; I have always thought it was ineffective and sort of pointless. Well, I’ve changed my mind. Recently we were discussing social networking in my publishing thesis class, and facebook and myspace came up. I raised the question, “Has anyone in here actually used facebook successfully as a marketing tool? Do you click through to ads, or is it a waste?”

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Basically… people are lazy

January 28, 2009

Basically, people are lazy. Publishers forget this. Even I did. They want “content” – no matter what the format – delivered to where ever they are already reading things. They don’t want to have to go looking for something to read – they’d rather it be delivered to their doorstep, to their inbox or to their blackberry/iphone etc.

However, as a recent post on MediaPost Magazines mentions,

“I realized that what I like about Time, or any print vehicle for that matter – be it magazine or newspaper or broadsheet or pamphlet – is that I am exposed to tidbits of information and long-form thought pieces that I don’t necessarily want to fetch.”

It is this quality that magazines, newspapers and print producers of every kind need to remember. If they choose their market, they can provide things that that market didn’t know it wanted to read – but that they will find interesting, nonetheless. While, essentially, this is what “cookies” (web sites use cookies to track what you look at to provide you ads you are most likely to be receptive to) do for advertising, nothing currently exists that can bring together different written content and deliver it in an interesting package and deliver it to the consumer – without them having to do a lick of work.

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Some Cheese with that Whine … Books, their readers and the big E

December 10, 2008

This is the second part of my multi-part series, “Some Cheese with that Whine …”, a follow up to the first part, on books (here). Publishing companies have a lot to ‘whine’ about these days. There are a lot of problems they are facing and they don’t seem to be able to figure out how to climb out of the holes they’ve dug for themselves.

The Whine….

Today’s book publishing world is worried about the changes in format (print to electronic), and is very focused on trying to wedge their way into the consumer conscious. With all the other types of ‘entertainment’ media out there, books take up a smaller portion of the industry then they once did. Publishers are trying (some in very interesting ways) to make their books stand out, and the convince customers to buy their products. So here’s some discussion on E Books, and the people who (still) read.

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