Posted tagged ‘publishers’

A Publishing Brand

February 17, 2009

Today, I received my latest Borders Member email, and included a mention of the book Deeper, part of a series by Roderick Gordon and Brian Williams, released earlier this month. None of that is significant, on it’s own. However, the first line of the ad for the book is, “From the publisher of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter books come another series about a boy and the depths of evil.”

picture-3The idea that the book is being marketed to the Harry Potter audience is what caught my eye. Is Scholastic (probably one of the publishing companies best known to consumers as a brand, and therefore well positioned to try this) trying to brand their company? Traditionally, publishing companies have tried to brand books by author. The opening line of this ad  doesn’t NAME the publisher in question. So it is assuming that consumers either know who published Harry Potter, or that they don’t care but will buy from that publisher BECAUSE of what they’ve previously published.

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Basically… people are lazy

January 28, 2009

Basically, people are lazy. Publishers forget this. Even I did. They want “content” – no matter what the format – delivered to where ever they are already reading things. They don’t want to have to go looking for something to read – they’d rather it be delivered to their doorstep, to their inbox or to their blackberry/iphone etc.

However, as a recent post on MediaPost Magazines mentions,

“I realized that what I like about Time, or any print vehicle for that matter – be it magazine or newspaper or broadsheet or pamphlet – is that I am exposed to tidbits of information and long-form thought pieces that I don’t necessarily want to fetch.”

It is this quality that magazines, newspapers and print producers of every kind need to remember. If they choose their market, they can provide things that that market didn’t know it wanted to read – but that they will find interesting, nonetheless. While, essentially, this is what “cookies” (web sites use cookies to track what you look at to provide you ads you are most likely to be receptive to) do for advertising, nothing currently exists that can bring together different written content and deliver it in an interesting package and deliver it to the consumer – without them having to do a lick of work.

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Some Cheese with that Whine… Books and new media

December 23, 2008

This is the third part of my multi-part series, “Some Cheese with that Whine …”, a follow up to the first and second part, on books. Publishing companies have a lot to ‘whine’ about these days – social media, free web content, etc. But instead, some of them are actually going out and doing things about it. Some are investing in new marketing initiates and proving that books are still an entertainment sector, capable of entertaining the masses.

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Some Cheese with that Whine … Books, their readers and the big E

December 10, 2008

This is the second part of my multi-part series, “Some Cheese with that Whine …”, a follow up to the first part, on books (here). Publishing companies have a lot to ‘whine’ about these days. There are a lot of problems they are facing and they don’t seem to be able to figure out how to climb out of the holes they’ve dug for themselves.

The Whine….

Today’s book publishing world is worried about the changes in format (print to electronic), and is very focused on trying to wedge their way into the consumer conscious. With all the other types of ‘entertainment’ media out there, books take up a smaller portion of the industry then they once did. Publishers are trying (some in very interesting ways) to make their books stand out, and the convince customers to buy their products. So here’s some discussion on E Books, and the people who (still) read.

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Books: The Only Ad free Media Today

October 28, 2008

I discussed a little bit in my last post how media these days seems to revolve around advertisers. It’s no longer a system where content is created for readers, then advertisers pay to be seen by those reads. Now, frequently, content is devised to interest advertisers, since they pay the overhead costs, then it is ‘marketed’ to readers.

Most of our media today exposes us to ads. Conservative sources say the average American is exposed to at least 347 ads a day – but other estimates are as high as 3000 ads. Newspapers, magazines and websites all expose us to them. The only media source that doesn’t expose us these days is books – except for the few pages at the back that tell us other books the publisher thought we might like.

Maybe that is part of the reason e-books and e-book readers haven’t caught on as much as their manufacturers might like.

Books are the one media that consumers really expect to be what THEY want. They aren’t personally interested in book brands – most readers couldn’t tell you who publishes their favorite books. They read because they enjoy it, because it provides a longer escape from reality then a magazine. So, any attempts to change this reading behavior is sure to be slow. And it needs to really consider what readers want and how they use books. (Bnet recently wrote an article on this).

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