Posted tagged ‘self publishing’

Q&A: Self-publishing

January 2, 2009

The digital age has impacted publishing in a wide-variety of ways. I’ve heard people who used to work at traditional publishers talk about how before the computer they would cut and paste – with paper and glue – to move things around for ‘new editions.’ Perhaps one of the biggest changes has been the author shift towards self-publishing. With Amazon and the internet, they don’t need the traditional publishers to place their books on shelves; and self-pubslihing allows them to stay in control and keep a greater percentage of the profits. In order to better understand the trend towards self-publishing, below you’ll find a Q&A I conducted with John Marino of BRIO publishing.

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Some Cheese with that Whine … Books, their readers and the big E

December 10, 2008

This is the second part of my multi-part series, “Some Cheese with that Whine …”, a follow up to the first part, on books (here). Publishing companies have a lot to ‘whine’ about these days. There are a lot of problems they are facing and they don’t seem to be able to figure out how to climb out of the holes they’ve dug for themselves.

The Whine….

Today’s book publishing world is worried about the changes in format (print to electronic), and is very focused on trying to wedge their way into the consumer conscious. With all the other types of ‘entertainment’ media out there, books take up a smaller portion of the industry then they once did. Publishers are trying (some in very interesting ways) to make their books stand out, and the convince customers to buy their products. So here’s some discussion on E Books, and the people who (still) read.

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Some cheese for that whine…. Books and Self-Publishing

November 28, 2008

Publishing companies have a lot to ‘whine’ about these days. There are a lot of problems they are facing and they don’t seem to be able to figure out how to climb out of the holes they’ve dug for themselves. This is part I of a 3 part series that I’m going to publish on here … each will be on one of the major publishing sectors. They will incorporate some of the major issues facing that sector of publishing today and some solutions that have come up through discussions with classmates, professors, industry professionals and through research and reading.

The Whine….

Today’s book publishing world is filled with amazon and the kindle, authors who no longer see the value in trading their earnings for the offering of a big publishing house and so instead choose to self-publish, Oprah, pricing issues and Google. Each of these issues is changing the industry as we know it, and deserves to be discussed and evaluated (although perhaps not in that order).

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Freelance : New Magazines

October 17, 2008

For any one out there who freelances or would like to, Mr. Magazine (note: once you’ve gone to the page, click on the month listings on the left hand side to bring up the magazine titles) has put up a great post with all the new magazines of 2008 to-date. A lot of them are likely accepting freelance writing, and their editors are unlikely to have regular writers already. So query away!

The Newest Market

March 17, 2008

Publishers everywhere are trying to figure out how to ‘get into’ the new media market. E books, blogs, etc. are attracting new generations of readers and in some cases replacing the role books used to play in our society. The best example is probably sites like dictionary.com – who used to go to college without a dictionary? Now students just hop online; who needs the physical book

It’s like Alexandra Erin, who maintains Pagesunbound.com said, “it’s a very simple equation: if money is being lost to free content, then that’s where the money is.

Today on Booksquare there is a great article. It states that contrary to the panic-position that less people are reading, the newer generations may actually be reading more. Included in the article are some ways that publishers are seriously behind – markets that are being run by fans and fanatics, rather then being exploited by publishers.

The position she doesn’t consider is that from a publisher’s view point, as long as the sites exist they are free advertising. The moment publishers create similar sites they are suddenly paying someone to run the site and adding to their own workload, and the sites are rarely create a direct form of income. Production departments across the board are looking at these sites and trying to generate buzz about their work on them; at least the major publishers are, so they are aware that those markets exist. But I think that their lack of direct involvement in the creation of such sites shows that they don’t believe that running the sites themselves (or similar sites) would actually generate more profit.

That’s is the biggest problem with the internet from a big business viewpoint – how do you use it to make money? The web requires giving away the content that you traditionally generated revenue from.

When that dilemma is  solved, I think we will see an immediate surge of publishing companies jumping feet first into the virtual world.